Our Country’s devolved to the point where Beyoncé’ is considered a role model.  I’m not just referring to teenyboppers enamored with her music and dancing style.  No, I’m talking about heads of state.  Both President and Michelle Obama gush over Beyoncé’, referring to her as

“the perfect role model for our daughters.”

I guess the term “role model” has been hijacked by a society sprinting to “hell in a hand basket.”

Webster’s defines the term role model as,

“Someone who another person admires and tries to be like.”

lemonageMany people cite positive exemplars in their lives as role models.  Common character traits to
emulate might be: respectable, responsible, trustworthy, sacrificial, person of integrity, etc.  These attributes seem worthy of imitation and ought to serve as a rule of thumb for those seeking imitable persons.   Though I don’t know Beyoncé’ personally, her public mannerisms and performance antics fail miserably in setting a good example for our daughters today.

I’m not being judgmental, I’m basing this critique upon the lyrics of her newest music release, Lemonade.  According to Danielle Campoamor at Romper, the song stands as an embodiment of how

“you’re entitled to your feelings; and by feeling them and letting them go, you free yourself.”

Campoamor goes on to write,

“This one song from Lemonade, “Freedom,” proved that when it comes to Beyoncé and her creative vision, we’re not ready and we’re not worthy, but we’re in desperate need of her message.”

We’re in desperate need of her message?  What’s the message propelling desperate souls to find solace in the musical talents of  Beyoncé’?  Popular online blogger Matt Walsh breaks it down nicely.  (I’d  share some of the lyrics, but I intend to keep this blog suitable for all age groups.)  Walsh sums up the message of Lemonade in the following way:

Lesson 1: Use sex as a weapon to possess and to gain revenge.

Lesson 2: Find self-worth in your money and the expensive things you can buy.

Lesson 3: See his blog for this one (warning, adult content)

Lesson 4: See his blog for this one (warning, adult content)

Lesson 5: Express your empowerment with middle fingers.

Lesson 6: Eat corn bread and collard greens.

The only lesson in this list suitable for our families would be to eat corn bread and collard greens…and personally, the thought of eating greens turns my stomach.  If your family loves Beyoncé’ and her brand of entertainment, I’m not intending to shame you.  But are the lessons listed in Walsh’s critique, the ideologies we want to instill in our children…especially our daughters?

As Christian parents, it’s our responsibility to lead our children in the “paths of righteousness.”  Her songs, rife with profanities and sexual themes, drive listeners down the broad road of destruction.  Allowing these lyrics to resonate in our mind steers our spiritual GPS away from the admonition found in Philippians 4:8,

“Finally, brothers and sisters, whatever is true, whatever is noble, whatever is right, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is admirable–if anything is excellent or praiseworthy–think about such things.”

For in thinking about “such things,” our hearts will be drawn to folks worthy of imitation, and ultimately to the Lord Jesus Christ.  And it’s in Him, where the desperate souls of this world will find true freedom, because true freedom comes when personal repentance meets God’s grace.

Don’t drink the Lemonade.

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